By Sophia Bennett on December 08, 2011

Three-plus tons and 23 feet tall, WEEE Man is an eye-opening e-waste installation aimed at changing British consumers' e-waste disposal habits.

Weighing in at more than 3 tons and standing nearly 23 feet tall, the WEEE Man isn’t your ordinary crusader for good. But his size definitely gives him an advantage.

People who see the leering two-story creation can’t resist walking over to find out what it is. What they learn is that the statue conveys a vital message about consumption, recycling and the impact electronic waste has on the planet.

The WEEE Man is the brainchild of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (more commonly known as The RSA), a centuries-old British think tank. He’s made from 3.3 metric tons of WEEE, or “waste electrical and electronic equipment,” which represents the average amount of electronic waste a single British citizen will generate in his or her lifetime.

The WEEE Man contains (among other things) 35 cell phones, 23 computer mice, 12 electric kettles, eight toasters, seven vacuum cleaners, six televisions, five refrigerators, four lawn mowers, three satellite dishes and one sewing machine. He was created to draw attention to the European Union’s WEEE Directive, which went into effect in January 2006.

Contemporary artist Paul Bonomini, the WEEE Man’s designer, said: “I designed him to look like he’s dragging himself out of landfill, coming back from the dead. He’s there to remind us of this monster that we’re creating when we dump these goods rather than recycle them.”

An ominous idea, but a good one all the same. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that in 2007 electronics recyclers collected 414,000 tons of material. That doesn’t include any e-waste that was reused or simply landfilled. On the whole, consumption is going up, not down, so Americans are certainly generating plenty of electronic waste as well.

The WEEE Directive requires that all member countries collect at least 4 kilograms of electrical or electronic waste per person every year. Manufacturers must participate in takeback efforts, and there are strict rules about exporting electronic waste. The law strongly encourages reuse as well as recycling.

While the U.S. hasn’t implemented such a comprehensive recycling program, 23 states now have electronics recycling laws intended to keep e-waste out of local landfills. Many of them include extended producer responsibility, or a requirement for manufacturers to find ways for their products to be reused or recycled rather than thrown away.

The WEEE Man now resides at The Eden Project, a hub for social and environmental programs, in Cornwall, England. His new home gives him the opportunity to continue his mission of influencing people to reduce, reuse and recycle, one washing machine at a time.

About the author

Sophia Bennett is a freelance writer based in Eugene, OR. Her work has been featured in more than a dozen magazines, newspapers and blogs. She is a dedicated home recycler, an avid thrift store shopper and a huge compost nerd.

Sophia's other professional experience include six years with the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, an internationally recognized leader in the field of nonprofit waste-based business development, and a year as an economic development and recycling coordinator in the U.K. She's volunteered with the Oregon State University Extension Service Compost Specialist program and Willamette Farm and Food Coalition. In her spare time she enjoys cooking, reading, crafts, gardening and spending time with her husband and twin daughters.


Learn more about Sophia Bennett

Comments

There are no comments for this post yet


Articles by Sophia Bennett

How to Recycle Cigarette Ashes and Waste

By Sophia Bennett on May 22, 2015

If you're a smoker or just looking to prevent cigarette butts from littering your community, you have recycling options!

How to Recycle Radiators

By Sophia Bennett on May 20, 2015

Whether it's a car radiator or a house one, here's how to get rid of it in an environmentally responsible manner.

How to Recycle Gasoline

By Sophia Bennett on May 15, 2015

Gasoline is a highly dangerous and flammable substance, so it should come as no surprise that recycling it can be a bit complicated.

Mixed Greens Articles

Current News

Non-Profit in San Diego Teaches Recycling & Art to Local Students

By 1-800-RECYCLING on March 31, 2015

Art FORM is teaching young students and the San Diego community to look at recyclables in a new light.

3 Food Companies Making an Eco-Friendly Splash

By 1-800-RECYCLING on March 30, 2015

Some companies see "green" and "eco-friendly" as handy marketing buzzwords, but we highlight three food companies that demonstrate what it means to go green.

Recycling Profile: Phoenix

By 1-800-RECYCLING on January 16, 2015

One of the country's largest curbside recycling programs is found in Phoenix, where the city is taking new measures to reach a 40% diversion rate goal.

Loading