By Marina Hanes on March 22, 2011

Those plastic bread bags really add up over time. Think of all the creative reuse possibilities!
Reusing Bread Bags
Many supermarkets offer recycling bins for their plastic shopping bags, but what about bread bags? Bread bags are commonly made from low-density polyethylene (plastic #4), so they can be recycled at home as long as your local service pick-up accepts this type of plastic. Another option is to reuse the bags, and there are many penny pinchers out there with time- and money-saving tricks that involve the simple bread bag.

Whether you’re single or part of a large household, bread is most likely one food item readily available in the kitchen. Bread bags can be reused in many ways, so there’s no excuse why you shouldn’t be trying different ways to reuse them in your own home. Some families have utilized the same bread bags for more than 25 years, washing them out and storing them for later use. From packing sandwiches, to transforming them into icing piping bags, the sky is the limit. Here are some more ideas for how to reuse your plastic bread bag:

  • Pack lunches and snacks
  • Reuse for picnics and road trips
  • Use as a glove for greasing pans
  • Store fruit and vegetables from the garden
  • Irrigate plants slowly by filling the bag with water and poking holes in it
  • Collect food scraps for the compost bin
  • Pack shoes or toiletries for traveling
  • Use as a liner
  • Turn it into an ice bag for bumps and bruises
  • Marinade or season food
  • Store in the car as a car-sickness bag or a dirty diaper bag
  • Pick up pet droppings
  • Use as a freezer bag

Challenge your family to think of innovative and practical ways to keep these plastic bags out of the trash cycle. Remember, instead of buying more plastic containers, survive efficiently with bread bags.

About the author

Marina Hanes is a writer and editor based in Youngstown, OH. In addition to website content writing experience, she acquired researching and interviewing skills while working in a law office and a trauma research department.

Marina's grandfather, who was a forester, sparked her interest in sustainability. In 2008, she received a degree in professional writing and editing from Youngstown State University. In her spare time, she dabbles in fiction and children’s book writing, and her hobbies include yoga, skiing, kayaking and reading. Living with three cats and three dogs only makes life more fulfilling.

Marina owns Cat’s Eye Editing, LLC, and a listing of her published works can be found at CatsEyeEditing.com.


Learn more about Marina Hanes

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