By Elizah Leigh on November 09, 2010

Aluminum takes a remarkable amount of energy to produce for consumer usage, making recycling so very important.

Of all the earth’s natural elements, aluminum happens to be the third most abundant resource on our planet in its raw form.

With rather humble origins as a soft, red, mineral-laden rock called bauxite, highly valuable aluminum ore contains boehmite, diaspore and gibbsite as well as clay, iron hydroxides and free silica.

On an annual basis, more than 130 million tons of bauxite is extracted globally, and current estimates suggest that we have enough reserves to carry us through the next 400 years.

Found in tropical, subtropical and volcanic regions with excellent drainage below a ferruginous surface layer, the leaders in bauxite production continue to be Asia (including China and India), Central and South America (including Venezuela, Brazil, Jamaica, Guyana and Surinam), Russia, Africa, Iceland and Australia. In fact, the Land Down Under meets close to one-third of our total global demand.

Extraction process

Open-pit mining (also known as surface, open-cast or strip mining), in which large swaths of earth are excavated relatively close to the surface in order to remove valuable materials, enables workers to locate raw bauxite.

The material is then transported to smelter or reduction plants where it is placed into a caustic chemical bath of sodium hydroxide in order to dissolve the desired metal at very high temperatures.

Following filtration and subsequent heating of the mixture at 1,000º C, the molten solution is then augmented with cryolite.

Through electrolysis (the introduction of a very intense electrical current), the liquefied aluminum can then be successfully extracted, cleaned and poured into solid ingots.

Approximately 1 ton of aluminum oxide is produced from every 4 tons of mined bauxite.

Products made with aluminum

Laundry detergent, cement, aspirin, roofing, soda cans, house siding, spark plugs, foil containers, foil wrap, makeup, appliances, fluorescent light bulbs, dishwashers, cookware coatings, chemicals, deodorant, polishing compounds, household siding, antacids, toothpaste, multiple types of transportation vehicles (including automobiles, military vehicles, planes, marine transportation and trains).

Environmental impact

Overall, the entire process of transforming raw bauxite into aluminum is incredibly energy intensive, requiring copious amounts of electricity, water and resources to produce (that is the main reason why power plants are built solely to support the aluminum industry).

Since pure aluminum ore is so stable, an extraordinary amount of electricity is required to yield the final product and, at least in the U.S., half of the smelting energy consumed is courtesy of coal, one of the most notoriously polluting fuel sources known to mankind.

The EPA says that the release of perfluorocarbons during the aluminum smelting process are 9,200 times more harmful than carbon dioxide in terms of their affect on global warming.

When bauxite is extracted from the earth, the strip-mining process removes all native vegetation in the mining region, resulting in a loss of habitat and food for local wildlife as well as significant soil erosion.

The caustic red sludge and toxic mine tailings that remain are commonly deposited into excavated mine pits where they ultimately seep into aquifers, contaminating local water sources.

Greenhouse gas emissions released during smelting and processing (which have been found to blanket surrounding regions with toxic vapors) include carbon dioxide, perfluorocarbons, sodium fluoride, sulfur dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and a vast list of other problematic elements.

Particulates released during processing that are known to compromise air quality include combustion byproducts, caustic aerosols, dust from bauxite, limestone, charred lime, alumina and sodium salt.

Aluminum Extraction

Compared to producing virgin aluminum from raw bauxite, recycling old aluminum consumes just 5% of the energy and releases a mere 5% of the greenhouse gases.

Infinitely recyclable, aluminum loses none of its integrity even when it is melted down repeatedly, plus, the whole recycling process can be achieved in less than 60 days flat.

Recycling just four cases of beer containing a total of 96 cans saves enough energy to keep a laptop computer running for well over a month.

Aluminum is economical to recycle and yields consistent income for municipalities (despite fluctuations in scrap prices) as well as charities and community causes.

Landfills across the globe continue to be the final resting place for infinite numbers of aluminum beverage cans, which, when incinerated, contaminate air with toxic compounds and take up to 500 years to fully decompose.

By recycling already-manufactured aluminum materials, precious space can be conserved in landfills and no new waste materials are produced!

About the author

Elizah Leigh is an eco-inspired wordsmith capable of captivating readers in just the right manner to facilitate subliminal greenlightenment. If it hasn’t yet happened to you, dear reader, don’t worry... it soon will. She believes that walking on the green side of life isn’t so much about random actions like recycling household materials and eschewing bottled water as it really should be about committing to long-term lifestyle changes that naturally become effortless the more frequently they are practiced — and believe it or not, if you’re looking at the world through green-colored glasses, it’s never a chore.

Working as an eco-journalist for a number of online venues, including Ecorazzi, WebEcoist, WebUrbanist and Causecast, this self-confessed eager greenie and knowledge hound has become deeply entrenched in the world of green living and makes a conscious effort at all times to practice exactly what she preaches. Elizah feels that no one is an "expert" in this field as long as they continue to keep an open mind by acquiring new eco-feathers in their cap — something that she aspires to do with each new article that she authors.

Extremely passionate about greening perspectives as well as lifestyles one carefully selected word at a time, this eco-writer feels privileged to add the 1-800-RECYCLING audience to her increasingly expanding network of green-minded readers. When she’s not tweeting her ever-lovin’ greenie heart out or adding new eco-themed articles to her portfolio, she can be found frolicking outside or shooting the breeze with her menagerie of impossibly needy geriatric felines.

As for what Elizah hopes to bring to 1-800-RECYCLING? Believe it or not, she is convinced that we are all capable of carving out individual and collective legacies in which caring enough about what we do while we walk this earth ensures that future generations enjoy the same basic privileges that we currently do. Can collections of carefully crafted environmentally themed words help facilitate this lofty plan for eco-friendly ah-ha! inspiration? Stranger things have been done to honor Mother Nature. For now, that’s her eager greenie goal, and she’s definitely sticking to it.


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